Why I (Still) Love Tech: In Defense of a Difficult Industry

Stefan Dinse/EyeEm/Getty Images (clouds) And yet I still love the big T, by which I mean either “technology” or “trillions of dollars.” Why wouldn’t I? I came to New York City at the age of 21, in the era of Java programming, when Yahoo! still deserved its exclamation point. I’d spent my childhood expecting nuclear holocaust and suddenly came out of college with a knowledge of HTML and deep beliefs about hypertext, copies of WIRED (hello) and Ray Gun bought at the near-campus Uni-Mart. The 1996 theme at Davos was “Sustaining Globalization”; the 1997 theme was “Building the Network Society.” One just naturally follows the other. I surfed the most violent tsunami of capital growth in the history of humankind. …

50 great tracks for May from FKA twigs, Sunn O))), Stormzy and more

From Bruce Springsteens return to Dorian Electras magnificent electropop read about 10 of our favourite songs of the month and subscribe to our 50-track playlist of the best new music to start summer

Carly Rae Jepsen: Im more confident in my weirdness now

The Canadian popstar on true love, bad outfits and her new album, Dedicated When greatest chorus of the 21st century, she was aiming for a sense of childish excitement. Its how she writes much of her pop as she puts it today, I want to feel Im on the top of a mountain with Beyonc-wind in my hair and I can fly for a second. Jepsen is one of pops more intriguing characters. When Call Me Maybe entered the Hot 100 in her home country, Canada, seven years ago she thought shed made it. Then Justin Bieber heard the impossibly catchy track, creaky version on live TV. In the video for Jepsens follow-up hit, I Really Like You, Famous Blue …

How the Videogame Aesthetic Flows Into All of Culture

When the science fiction film Edge of Tomorrow, directed by Doug Liman, came out in 2014, WIRED called it “the best videogame you can’t play.” The film’s main character, Bill Cage, repeats the same day again and again—a day of futuristic combat with aliens. Each time he dies, Cage wakes up again on the previous day. Everything is as before, with the crucial difference that he remembers all the previous versions of that fatal next day. The repetitions are the film’s equivalent of a videogame’s replayability, and Cage’s battle skills improve, just as a player’s skills improve through replay. But Cage is not a player. He is a character in a narrative film, so the repeated days are in fact …

Richard Madden: I dont like the look of me in the mirror

Bodyguard made him a star but he hasnt always been comfortable as the lead. He talks about bullies, his inner fat lad and new Elton John biopic Rocketman For some lucky actors, there are moments when their career suddenly shifts into a higher gear. The right part comes along, the world notices, and boom! their whole life is different. This happened to Richard Madden with Bodyguard, in August last year. He played the tight-mouthed, tight-muscled David Budd, personal minder to Keeley Hawes home secretary, Julia Montague, in Jed Mercurios six-part BBC One thriller, and the country went bananas. Bodyguard was great TV gripping, unpredictable, sexy, with a madly OTT finale but nobody could have predicted the furore it would cause. …