Why Mrs Fletcher is the most underrated show on TV right now

The HBO limited series starring Kathryn Hahn provides a fascinating commentary on sex, online porn and existential uncertainty Mrs Fletcher is not a show likely to inspire a rabid fanbase. The HBO miniseries, based on the 2017 Tom Perrotta novel of the same name, is a small show, in the vein of Ramy, Shrill or Fleabag: half-hour series whose worlds revolve around one deep, rich well of a character surrounded by a knockout supporting cast. But where, say, Shrill rocket-launches one millennial womans self-acceptance (and writing career) and Fleabag shatters, well, everything, Mrs Fletcher is decidedly more understated, indecisive, moody. Its namesake, Eve Fletcher (Kathryn Hahn), is a mid-40s single mother in suburbia whose attempts to bond with and discipline …

Dollface review slick but skin-deep female friendship comedy

A new sitcom about re-entering the world of female friendship after a long relationship has some strong ideas, but is limited in heart The breakup underlying Dollface, a new half-hour comedy from Hulu, seems implausibly cold and abrupt. One minute, Jules (Kat Dennings, now free of Two Broke Girls) is having lunch with her boyfriend; the next, despite the fact that, as she says, theyve spent every day for the past half-decade together, he doesnt love her any more. Then again, very little of Dollface at the outset makes sense; Jules is promptly picked up by a bus driver with the head of a cat and, in a dream sequence that regenerates each episode, the crazy cat lady visualizes Juless …

Last Christmas review Emma Thompson’s romcom is an overstuffed turkey

An attempt to pay tribute to the music of George Michael and the fandom of Love Actually fails on both counts and at many more things along the way Somewhere in the last decade, audiences, and in turn financiers, fell out of love with the London-set romantic comedy, a subgenre that had almost single-handedly been keeping the British film industry alive, or at least somewhat in profit. They were repetitive, predictable and filled with characters who were exclusively, uncomfortably, posh and white yet they were also undeniably effective crowd-pleasers and like many, Ive missed them, as parodical as they can often be. So has Emma Thompson, it seems. Because with all the confidence of a well-spoken Oxbridge alumnus delivering a …